Feb 12, 2011

Gary Moore Band - Grinding Stone (1973)

EAC | FLAC TRACKS+CUE+LOG+Covers | 325 mb+3% recovery | Repertoire 2005

This was the 1st, and last, album to be recorded by the Gary Moore Band (which featured Moore on vocals and guitar, Pearse Kelly on drums and percussion and John Curtis on bass). Moore’s guitar playing is absolutely sublime. However, to those that love his bluesy stuff, you mightn’t like this album because it was done at a time when Moore thought that to be a great guitarist you had to be fast.
With only six tracks on this CD you’d be forgiven for thinking that 1973’s Grinding Stone was an EP. In fact, it’s a stupendously brilliant LP. This was at a time when Gary Moore had grown out of his bluesy roots and this was the start of a good long time doing rock. One of the special things about Moore is his unwillingness to do the same thing twice. Throughout his career he has played classical, blues, jazz, and in 1973, Hard Rock guitar. All of it exceptional.
Tracklist:
1. Grinding Stone (instrumental)
2. Time To Heal
3. Sail Across The Mountain
4. The Energy Dance (instrumental)
5. Spirit
6. Boogie My Way Back Home


Personnel:
Gary Moore - guitar, vocals
Frank Boylan - bass
John Curtis - bass
Philip Donnelly - guitar
Pearse Kelly - percussion, drums
Jan Schelhaas - keyboards
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1 коммент.:

Terry said...

I saw this band play live, as a three-piece, at Keele University. I was enticed into the concert hall by the rather good sound of the support act (Ace, of "How Long" fame, if memory serves me correctly). When the late, lamented Gary Moore's band came on stage they had the biggest drumkit I'd ever seen, and a drummer (Pearse Kelly, it said across the bass drums)who didn't appear to be able to play any of it. On the evidence of this album, I guess he must have had an off-night as he seems quite capable. That concert is the only one I can remember voluntarily leaving, due to it being insufferably loud. Many thanks for allowing me to reappraise a period in Gary Moore's career (without the ear-bleeding volume) that I hadn't had the chance to appreciate before.
Terry